Slipknot News

Corey Taylor Talks About “.5: The Gray Chapter” Artwork

Corey Taylor (#8 of Slipknot, Stone Sour) says that when he first saw the image that became the cover artwork for the band’s long-awaited fifth album, “.5: The Gray Chapter”, he was “so blown away” that he immediately knew Slipknot had found what it was looking for.

The “.5: The Gray Chapter” was designed by M. Shawn “Clown” Crahan, who is the percussionist and founding member of Slipknot. Crahan is also the art director for Slipknot and directed their DVDs, “Disasterpieces”, “Voliminal: Inside The Nine”, “Of The (sic)”, and “(sic)nesses: Live at Download”. He has been the creative vision behind the band since their inception.

“The minute I saw that image, I knew that it was the cover,” Taylor told Mistress Carrie of the Worcester/Boston, Massachusetts radio station WAAF, “because the great thing about Clown is that… He does all the artwork for us, he comes up with so much of the concepts, and he’s really never gotten the amount of credit that I think he deserves. So when he came in, he had some of this fantastic artwork, I was so blown away. But that one image was so striking, and I think it told so many different stories just in that one image. Because it’s black and white, but if you look at it, there’s so much gray in it without the color gray even being there. I just knew that was our moment, that was our image, that’s what we were gonna put up and hold up to the world and say, ‘This is our album.’ I just knew that was it.”

Slipknot .5: The Gray Chapter

Source: Blabbemouth

Corey Taylor And Jim Root Talk About ‘.5: The Gray Chapter’

Slipknot singer Corey Taylor says that the band wanted to pay tribute to its late bassist Paul Gray with the group’s fifth studio album, “.5: The Gray Chapter”, but struggled to get the right wording for the CD title. “We had a handful of [ideas] that we were kind of bandying about,” Taylor told Mistress Carrie of the Worcester/Boston, Massachusetts radio station WAAF. “And me and Clown were talking about… We just kind of got on the phone together, and it was, like, ‘Look, what do you think?’ And we went back and forth a handful of times until we both kind of hit on the title. And we both sat back and we were, like, ‘That’s it. That feels really, really good.’ ‘Cause we knew there was gonna be a dedication to Paul there. We didn’t know how to do it, we didn’t have the exact wording until we both kind of sat down and shot it back and forth and really got to the point where we knew we had the title.”

According to Taylor, the lyrics on “.5: The Gray Chapter” deal with many of the emotions, including denial and acceptance, that he and his bandmates felt in the four years since Paul Gray passed away.

“Just from a lyrical standpoint, I knew that there were gonna be a handful of songs about Paul,” Corey said. “Because we miss him, we love him. But I also knew that in order to tell this correctly, we were gonna have to come at it from a very emotional point of view, and that meant facing some of the emotions that we had dealt with over the last four years, whether it was guilt, anger… Because there is a natural progression that happens before you kind of reach that point of acceptance. And there’s nobody really there to coach you through it. And, in fact, this band, we didn’t even talk about it until we got into the studio. I mean, even on the road, we were just kind of ducking our head and getting through it and doing what we could for each other. But until we got into the studio, until some of the guys started reading what I was writing, we hadn’t talked about it, we hadn’t talked about what we had all gone through indivudally. And when we did that, it opened up so much for us that it then became music without fear. Because we all knew we had each other’s back. There’s some songs about that on there as well. ‘Cause some of the stuff was written in the studio. So there’s a lot of pain here. But at the same time, it’s because you’re going through these roller coasters of emotion and you’re trying to get a handle on them until you just, basically, kind of resign yourself to the point where you’re not gonna get a handle on it until you let yourself feel it. And that’s what it comes down to.”

Jim Root, who composed much of the music for “.5: The Gray Chapter”, told Revolver magazine that Gray influenced the songwriting process for the new CD.

“It’s weird, man,” Root said. “I’m not a very spiritual person, and the whole religion thing, I’m kind of on the fence about a lot of that stuff. So when somebody loses someone who’s close to them and says that they’re still with them, I’ve always thought that was bullshit or whatever. But I was out in the garage and working on an arrangement for a song that turned into either ‘The Devil In I’ or ‘Sarcastrophe’. Normally when I write, I throw down the first thing I come up with, then I double it, then I throw a bass on it, and then I put the drums around it. But on this arrangement, I noticed that I wasn’t just throwing the riff down — I was trying different variations on it, trying different positions on the neck, and thinking about melodies while coming up with what the chord progression was going to be…

“I suddenly realized, ‘Fuck, man! That’s what Paul used to do!’ Paul was so meticulous. He would overthink everything, even if it was just how to get from one chord to the next chord. He would explore every possibility on the fretboard, especially if he was writing it on the guitar. And it made me go, He’s here, man — he’s helping me write this shit! And it blew my fucking mind. I had to put my guitar down, and I put my head in my hands. I was like, ‘You fucker!'”

“.5: The Gray Chapter” will be released on October 21 via Roadrunner. It is Slipknot‘s first without album without Paul Gray and drummer Joey Jordison, who was fired from the band in December.

James Root Slipknot .5: The Gray Chapter

Source: Blabbermouth

Corey Taylor: Firing Joey Jordison ‘Was One Of The Hardest Decisions We Ever Made’

Corey Taylor says that firing Joey Jordison, Slipknot‘s drummer of 18 years, was “one of the hardest decisions” the group ever made, but insists that he and his bandmates are “happy” to have moved on.

Slipknot announced its split with Jordison in December 2013 but did not disclose the reasons for his exit. The drummer subsequently issued a statement saying that he did not quit the group.

Speaking to UK’s Metal Hammer for the magazine’s October 2014 issue, Taylor stated about Joey’s departure from SlipknotT: “I can’t talk too much about it because we’re going through the legalities of everything right now and settling everything, but it’s when a relationship hits that T-section and one person’s going one way and you’re going the other. And try as you might to either get them to go your way or try and go their way, at some point you’ve got to go in the direction that works for you. This is me speaking in the broadest terms, with respect to Joey. I guess to sum it up, it was one of the hardest decisions we ever made.”

He continued: “We’re all happy right now and we hope that he is. I’ve known him since ’91, and that was before we were in bands together, and he’s incredibly talented; he’s just in a place in his life, right now, that’s not where we are… in the nicest terms.”

Asked to address rumors that Joey’s dismissal from Slipknot was drug related, Corey replied: “There’s only so far that I can give an explanation. For me, that has to be a sign of growing up, because before I would’ve just railed at whatever I thought the supposed evil was, but now it’s like, how do you explain to the fans? And that’s the hardest part, because no matter what explanation you give, it’s not gonna make them happy. I’m sure there are fans out there who have their own theories about it…”

According to Corey, he no longer has a relationship with Jordison. “I haven’t talked to Joey in a while, to be honest,” he told the magazine. “That’s how different we are. It’s not because I don’t love him and I don’t miss him. And it is painful; we talk about him all the time, but at the same time, do we miss him or do we miss the old him? That’s what it really comes down to. It’s just a fucking shame.”

Slipknot - Metal Hammer October 2014

Source: Blabbermouth

‘Fear Clinic’ – World Premiere Announced

“Fear Clinic”, the new horror flick which marks Slipknot and Stone Sour frontman Corey Taylor‘s first featured role in a film, will receive its world premiere on October 22 at the Screamfest Horror Film Festival in Hollywood, California. Taylor, along with the movie’s director, Robert Hall, will be on hand for a question-and-answer session.

Source: Blabbermouth

Corey Taylor 98 Rock Interview

Corey Taylor says that the fact that he is not a household name has helped him avoid all the “crappy side effects” of being the frontman of not only one but two world-renowned metal bands.

Asked how he unplugs from his many different projects, which have included solo tours and authoring a pair of best-selling books (“Seven Deadly Sins” and “A Funny Thing Happened On The Way To Heaven”), Taylor told Amelia of the 98 Rock radio station in Baltimore, Maryland: “Every once in a while, my wife and I will take a vacation. It’s pretty few and far between, because we work together. So half the reason that I’m able to do the things that I get to do is because my wife helps me do it; she’s been in band management for years, so we make a really good team.”

He continued: “You know, I don’t need a lot to recharge. Actually, one of the ways that I recharge is I come home. I spend time with my family, I hang out with my wife’s family, who I’m really, really close with. I spend time with my kids. That, to me, is unplugging and getting away from everything. ‘Cause I don’t live in Los Angeles; I still have my house in Iowa, and I have a house in Las Vegas, where most of my wife’s family lives. I have these places where I can kind of get away from everything. And I’m lucky enough to be probably the most famous person that no one’s ever heard of. So I can still go out and go grocery shopping and not get bugged. I can kind of do my thing and it’s all good. So I get all the benefits of being in the industry and doing my thing, and I don’t get any of the crappy side effects, where you never get a moment to yourself, you never get to any of these things. And I’m fine with that; I love that. I get to do all the fun stuff, all the creative stuff. I don’t get any of the… I get a little bit of it — don’t get me wrong — but I still get to do these things, because I enjoy doing them. And I think a lot of people, they hit a point in their career where they just stop enjoying it, so they start churning out crap; there’s no quality to the content. And for me, I’ve always been the guy who, I don’t do anything unless I really wanna do it. And I think that’s why my level of quality has remained up there, at least in my eyes.”

Taylor also spoke about the seemingly large number of veteran rock bands who have partaken in the reunion circuit in an attempt to cash in on revisiting their past without the benefit of great new music, or any new music at all in some cases.

“A lot of that comes down to the other side of, not only this industry, but of the lifestyle — if you get too wrapped up in the drugs or the womanizing or the hedonistic side of things,” Corey said. “And you stay there. It’s okay when you’re young, but then you stay in that for too long and it sucks the life out of you. And not only that, but it sucks everything around your life out of you. So then you get to the other side, and it’s, like, ‘Well, that was a great party, but now I have nothing to show for it.’ And luckily enough, I’ve got a lot of people around me who I’ve been able to kind of channel all that energy into making sure that they’re taken care of, and that’s what keeps me together.”

Corey Taylor - Slipknot

Source: Blabbermouth

Corey Taylor Talks About Paul Gray

Corey Taylor (#8 of Slipknot, Stone Sour) says that the band had a hard time finding a “direction” in the four years since the passing of the group’s bassist Paul Gray and credits the Slipknot fans for helping the band get through the pain of losing one of its key members.

“There were a handful of moments where I can honestly say that, it didn’t feel like the band was over, but we didn’t know… I mean, we were all kind of knocked for a loop,” Taylor told Mistress Carrie of the Worcester/Boston, Massachusetts radio station WAAF. “There were a handful of times where it was just, like, ‘What do we do now?’ I mean, that’s what it comes down to: what do we do now? And, luckily, we did it the right way, in my opinion, for us.”

He continued: “People deal with things completely differently, but I knew, for us, that it was gonna take getting back on stage and really kind of seeing if we wanted to do it without Paul. I mean, that was the biggest thing. So we went out and we did the Sonisphere shows [in Europe] three years ago, and it went really well. That first show was hard for us, but slowly but surely, the audience, man, the fans, they picked us up and they held us there, and they helped us get through it, to the point, by the time we got done with the Sonisphere shows, we knew that, ‘Okay, we can do this. We want to do this. Now what?’ There was a few more years where we were just kind of trying to figure out when the right time to make the new album would be. ‘Cause some of us didn’t wanna just run right in and record a bunch of stuff; we needed to feel right about it. And that time came at the beginning of the year. We all kind of got together and kind of put the pieces in place. We played a bunch of stuff for each other and we were, like, ‘This feels really good. Now let’s go into the studio and take these demos and make them Slipknot songs and let’s make some Slipknot music.'”

He added: “So there was never a time where it felt like it was over, but there was definitely a time where we couldn’t find a direction. And luckily we waited until it was the right time to do it.”

Corey Taylor - Slipknot

Source: Blabbermouth

Slipknot On The Cover Of Revolver Magazine

Slipknot is on the cover of the next issue of Revolver Magazine, which will hit newsstands on September 23 and is available for purchase online right now. Below you can view the cover, shot in L.A. by photographer Sean Murphy.

You also read an excerpt from the issue’s cover story, written by Senior Writer Dan Epstein. In this section, Slipknot’s Corey Taylor, Shawn “Clown” Crahan, and Jim Root discuss how their fallen bandmate Paul Gray, who passed away in 2010, influenced the group’s new album, ‘.5: The Gray Chapter.’

“It’s weird, man,” Jim Root says. “I’m not a very spiritual person, and the whole religion thing, I’m kind of on the fence about a lot of that stuff. So when somebody loses someone who’s close to them and says that they’re still with them, I’ve always thought that was bullshit or whatever. But I was out in the garage and working on an arrangement for a song that turned into either ‘The Devil in I’ or ‘Sarcastrophe.’ Normally when I write, I throw down the first thing I come up with, then I double it, then I throw a bass on it, and then I put the drums around it. But on this arrangement, I noticed that I wasn’t just throwing the riff down—I was trying different variations on it, trying different positions on the neck, and thinking about melodies while coming up with what the chord progression was going to be…

“I suddenly realized, Fuck, man! That’s what Paul used to do! Paul was so meticulous. He would overthink everything, even if it was just how to get from one chord to the next chord. He would explore every possibility on the fretboard, especially if he was writing it on the guitar. And it made me go, He’s here, man—he’s helping me write this shit! And it blew my fucking mind. I had to put my guitar down, and I put my head in my hands. I was like, You fucker!”

Gray’s spirit looms large over the new Slipknot album in other ways, as well. “There’s a lot of pain on here, there’s a lot of honesty, there’s a lot of insight as far as what we’ve been through,” says Corey Taylor. “There’s some anger, too. I mean, when you lose someone, there’s naturally part of you that gets really angry that you lost them. At the same time, you kind of have to concede that you have to be happy for the time you got with that person. A lot of stuff is pointed inwardly, as well, because naturally there’s a lot of survivor’s guilt going on, like, ‘What could I have done?’ That’s the burden of people left behind. You never get a good answer. All you can kind of do is make peace with it. And that’s what a lot of this album is about—making peace with the loss that we’ve suffered.”

“The circumstance of Paul’s death is one emotional thing that we all needed to deal with,” says Shawn “Clown” Crahan. “It took time before I could walk in, make an album, and feel good about it. I still cried, man. We all shed tears. But it just felt so good to get in there and get it all out.”

“We’ve been compared to scream therapy so many times,” adds Taylor, “and in a way, it was really great to be able to use that in a present tense. Not just exploding about things that happened in the past when we were younger, but real, adult stuff.”

Slipknot - Revolver Magazine 2014

Source: Revolver